All Wednesday night programs are held in the Community Center of Park Road Baptist Church. Dinner is available at 5:30pm (please call the church office by Tuesday, noon, to make a reservation: 704-523-5717). The program begins at 6:30pm, and all are welcome.


Looking for “Mercy”

In a world that usually ends with “Me”

Milford Dialogue Series
April 6, 13, 20 and 27

We say “Lord, have Mercy,” but Mercy is more than a word expressing exasperation, and it’s more than an antiquated concept from the pages of the Bible, where it shows up at least 139 times. Beyond biblical and theological imagery, Mercy has much practical value in a modern world of technology and industry and commerce.

In April the Milford Dialogue will focus on this word, and the important concepts that emerge from it. The word and its meaning may be greatly overlooked in our society of individual rights and angry retributions.

All programs are on Wednesday nights in the Community Center of Park Road Baptist Church. Dinner is available at 5:30pm (please call the church office by Tuesday, noon, to make a reservation: 704-523-5717). The program begins at 6:30pm, and all are welcome.

 

The Series

James Howell

On April 6, Dr. James Howell, pastor of Myers Park United Methodist Church, will introduce our series, exploring with us the biblical and theological dimensions of Mercy. Dr. Howell is the author of a number of books and a frequent contributor to Christian publications and the Charlotte Observer, where a recent editorial prompted this discussion (see “We Christians have harmed, and we’re sorry,” January 23, 2016).

 

 

 

 

Andy Baxter

On April 13 we will begin looking at practical implications as we explore Mercy in educational policy. Dr. Andy Baxter, VP for Educator Effectiveness at Southern Regional Education Board.   Education is a pressing concern in the life of our nation, now that the US has fallen below many advanced societies in education rankings. Might the practice of Mercy in our education system change this?

 

 

 

Mark Cramer

On April 20 our exploration continues as we evaluate the place of Mercy in our nation’s economic practice. Tax policy, housing, welfare, healthcare are topics of conversation and controversy, especially in an election year. What role does Mercy play as our leaders make specific recommendations for economic fairness and viability? Mark Cramer, a long time member of Park Road will lead our discussion this night.

Mark is Executive Director of the Greater Gaston Development Corporation and former Executive Director of the Real Estate and Building Industry Coalition of Charlotte.  He is an attorney with a background in leading non-profit, for profit and governmental organizations, particularly on issues related to growth and development and transportation.  He is a recipient of the Order of the Long Leaf Pine Society, awarded for service to the state of NC.

 

On April 27 we will conclude this series by providing an opportunity for congregational dialogue. What have you learned about Mercy? Do we need more or less of it in church, politics, economics? After facilitating this dialogue Russ Dean will offer a summary and concluding remarks.

 


 

About The Milford Dialogue

The Milford Dialogue was established in 2012 as a memorial to Charles O. Milford. The Dialogue is founded on the principle of Charlie’s adage, “With us truth is more a becoming than a having.” This statement expresses the character of his faith with its relentless pursuit of truth, and a willingness to follow that truth wherever it may lead. Guest speakers will be invited to present a lecture in the fall of each year, yet The Dialogue is to be more than a lecture series. Intended as a means of keeping the character of Charlie’s pursuit of truth alive in Park Road Baptist Church, thinkers and writers in a variety of disciplines will challenge the church to keep its theology alive and engaged in a commitment to a social gospel, with its impact on the ethical life of the Church and individuals.


Past Programs ...

 

How Charlotte Got Segregated

Dr. Tom Hanchett
March 16, 2016

 

Tom Hanchett, Consulting Historian with Levine Museum of the New South

Tom Hanchett, Consulting Historian with Levine Museum of the New South

On Wednesday, March 16, Tom Hanchett, Consulting Historian with Levine Museum of the New South, will join us for a program entitled, "How Charlotte Got Segregated."

Segregation on the basis of race and income has been in the news a lot lately. It was the background of troubles in Ferguson and Baltimore last year. It is interwoven in debates about pupil assignment in Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools today.  How did Charlotte become segregated? Dr. Tom Hanchett joins us March 16 to explore that surprising history.

Dr. Hanchett wrote the book, literally, on Charlotte’s growth: Sorting Out the New South City: Race, Class & Urban Development in Charlotte (UNC Press). He is Consulting Historian with Levine Museum of the New South, where he helped create a string of award-winning exhibitions. The Museum’s vision of “using history to build community” was honored in a White House ceremony by First Lady Laura Bush.  Tom is also known to readers of the Charlotte Observer for his column “Food From Home.”  He has also written several essays on the South which you can read at www.HistorySouth.org

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All Wednesday night programs are held in the Community Center of Park Road Baptist Church. Dinner is available at 5:30pm (please call the church office by Tuesday, noon, to make a reservation: 704-523-5717). The program begins at 6:30pm, and all are welcome.